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TCT Conference Programme

TCT Conference Programme

TCT Conference Programme 2018

The free-to-attend TCT Show Conference provides in-depth insight on design-to-manufacturing technology developments and their real-world applications. Here is the September 2018 programme for you to take a look at:

DAY 1: TRANSPORT & MATERIALS AND PROCESSES

DAY 2: HEALTHCARE & RESEARCH

DAY 3: DESIGN

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11:00
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Composite part manufacturers have to adhere to many prerequisites. These typically include the ability to produce lightweight, high-quality, designs as well as finding ways to increase productivity and reduce costs. In recent times, traditional production methodologies have begun to reach their limits with only incremental improvements. Planar, layer-by-layer, additive manufacturing has shown promise across the world. Recent breakthroughs, however, could transform composite manufacturing.

    Dr Karsten Heuser, Vice President of Additive Manufacturing at Siemens Digital Factory, will explore how AM composite part production is reaching new heights for industrial applications. The session will examine new advancements in hybrid AM and evaluate how these developments optimise composite structures with an unprecedented degree of geometric complexity, part consolidation, and additive part performance.  Dr Heuser will demonstrate how to unleash the full potential of composite manufacturing via a series of cases studies from across various industries. He will provide the attendees with the insights into the game-changing way of composite part production.

11:30
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Call it what you will- cusp, verge, threshold or tipping point, additive manufacturing is on the brink of positive change. AM, and those that use it, are poised for transformation, which for many aspects will come quickly. The pieces are coming together- technology, understanding and expectations–to usher in progress that has long been predicted. While on the path to this future, we will still encounter obstacles and challenges, but AM’s evolution makes them far less formidable. Join Todd to hear why he believes we are on the cusp, what the near-term future promises are and what actions are needed to make this future a reality.

     

12:00
  1. U50
    30 mins
12:30
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Presentation Level:  Intermediate

    The Aerospace Technology Institute's latest INSIGHT paper has been compiled to disseminate the findings of an aerospace sector consultation enabled through a partnership with Additive Manufacturing UK. This INSIGHT paper looks at the opportunities and challenges associated with the implementation of additive manufacturing technologies and how the benefits can be recognised across the aerospace structures, systems and propulsion

    communities. The paper gives an aerospace specific focus which builds on Additive Manufacturing UK’s 2017 multi-sectorial national strategy paper “Leading Additive Manufacturing in the UK”. Recommendations are provided for the civil aerospace sector to develop and exploit opportunities for a highly disruptive technology that has the potential to transform future aircraft platforms. Metal powder bed fusion has been up to now, the primary

    focus of the aerospace industry but other technologies such as direct energy deposition are gaining in their significance in the UK sector. This is reflected in this INSIGHT paper where six key topics have been addressed to accelerate Additive Manufacturing (AM) within the UK aerospace sector.

13:00
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Presentation Level: Advanced

    The SMILE (Small Innovative Launcher for Europe’ project) is coordinated by NLR and has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program.

    The DLR (German Aerospace Centre) Institute of Structures and Design is responsible for developing a reusable liquid rocket engine for the delivery of small satellites into sun-synchronous orbits (SSO). The design is based on ceramic engine components which are specifically qualified due to their high thermal shock resistance and high-temperature applicability – and enable the rocket engines to be reused. DLR partnered with leading additive manufacturing company, 3D Systems, to 3D print the highly complex injector head component.

    Using 3D printing to produce the component drastically changes the design methodology of coaxial injectors by avoiding multiple subcomponents and significantly lowering costs, while at the same time reducing the overall weight of the propulsion system and accelerating delivery. The prototype injector for LOX/kerosene operation was produced on a ProX DMP 320 metal printer at 3D Systems’ metal additive manufacturing site in Belgium.

    The first hot firing tests were successfully conducted and measured data shows very good mixing and combustion efficiencies of the 3D printed injector in combination with a water-cooled, metallic combustion chamber. Furthermore, DLR concluded that the production costs of the 3D printed injector component are less expensive than state-of-the-art injector heads manufactured via conventional manufacturing methods.

     

13:30
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Presentation Level: Beginner

    After being infatuated by cars and drawing as a child, Toby Mellor always knew he was going to be a car designer. In 2011, he graduated from the Coventry University with a master's degree in Automotive Design. Upon the completion of his studies, Toby started his career at JCB in the Industrial Design department. He created new machine concepts but maintained his passion for designing cars, motorcycles, and architectural structures. During that time, Toby also began working with niche companies as well as private clients. One of them was Auto Fabrica, a business specialising in bespoke motorcycles, founded by close friends Bujar and Gazmend Muharremi. In 2015, Toby moved to London and set up the design consultancy Auto Designworks, focusing on automotive, motorcycle and industrial design. With a growing list of influential clients, collaborations and special ongoing projects, the company and passion for being creative keeps on evolving.

14:00
  1. U50
    30 mins
15:00
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Presentation Level: Beginner

    One of the major challenges facing the Additive Manufacturing industry is a lack of suitable materials for real-world applications. Added Scientific are tackling this challenge by creating entirely new processes which allow previously impossible materials to now be printed.

    In this talk Chris Tuck, Director of Added Scientific and Professor of Materials Engineering at the University of Nottingham will present the work that they are doing and discuss what the future materials landscape could look like.

10:30
  1. U50
    30 mins

    “Company start-up” and “start-up incubation” are common occurrences in the current economic climate.  Many people have studied, and published, research regarding common factors that lead to success (or failure) of start-ups.

    • Does this research provide answers that apply to start-ups in the manufacturing technology space? Is manufacturing technology the same as other technology sectors – or are there differences that really matter?
    • Even more importantly, will a “start-up culture” redefine the manufacturing technology space – or will the manufacturing world shape a unique start-up culture for manufacturing technology companies?
       

    While there are not yet perfect answers to these questions, there is mounting evidence that provides illumination for us.  We will examine what seems to work – and what works less well – in this profound and exciting time.

11:00
  1. U50
    60 mins
12:00
  1. U50
    30 mins
12:30
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Presentation Level: Intermediate

    The most important part of a prosthesis is the prosthetic socket, made individually for each amputated limb. If it does not fit or is not comfortable, this severely limits the use of the whole prosthesis.

    Today, socket making is an artisan process, a bottleneck in prosthetic fitting, due to a rising number of amputees globally, and a decreasing number of qualified professionals. Finding a solution for this capacity constraint is urgent and critical.

    ProsFit’s scan to print solution radically improves the process to design, manufacture and fit custom-made sockets. It is highly scalable, allows higher productivity, better quality consistency, and improved outcomes.

    ProsFit has built a solution that could be used to fit over 20m amputees globally. To enable this, they have set up a network of approved manufacturers around the world, and are now cooperating with HP.

    This presentation will introduce ProsFit and the ProsFit Optimal sockets, regulated for limb wearers up to 125kg. The session will also provide an insight into the future and highlight how the same process could be used to deliver similar benefits in other healthcare sectors.

13:00
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Presentation Level:  Beginner

    3D printing adds an extra dimension to translating the digital data, obtained by dynamic pressure mapping, into foot orthosis alterations. This technology makes it possible to simulate multiple corrections that require different shore values, using a single PA12 material. It enables structure adjustments and working with intrinsic corrections. This presentation will look at the 3D printing workflow, including scanning digitization, design, and manufacture. It will evaluate the challenge of overcome scepticism from conservative industry members who do not have an affinity with AM technology.  Tom Peeters will also discuss how additive manufacturing brings back the experts to their core activity by offering new tools and services and focusing on the patients' needs.

13:30
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Presentation Level: Intermediate

    Trauma and Orthopaedic surgeon and onsite lead of the medical 3D printing lab at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Dr Gallagher will talk about the trust’s experience of using medical 3D printing for surgical planning.  Partnering with national service provider, axial3D, to set up an automated internal 3D print lab while having access to the company’s 3D printing facility, he will discuss how this automated approach has reduced costs, improved care and allowed the trust to scale up 3D printing quickly and effectively.

14:00
  1. U50
    30 mins
14:30
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Programme Level: Advanced

    With the use of Additive Manufacturing becoming increasingly prominent in a wide range of sectors, the majority of interest lies in the use of geometry to add value to products and components. Many of theAM techniques, however, present the opportunity to bring further benefits through the incorporation of increased functionality.

    This talk will focus on one such possibility –the potential to introduce anti-bacterial capabilities into AM parts. The presentation will examine the results of ongoing work, co-authored by James R. Wingham, Robert D. Turner, Thomas Paterson and Joanna Shepherd, from the University of Sheffield. Candice Majewski will investigate the efficacy of polymer/silver phosphate glass micro-composites to inhibit the growth of, and/or to destroy bacteria, under a range of conditions and with a range of material specifications. She will also discuss the potential for the use of this type of approach in real-world applications

15:00
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Presentation Level: Advanced

    Composites have been introduced for clinical application for their ability to mimic the hierarchical structure of human tissues. This talk will look at how the combination of two different materials with desired properties is a key advantage, particularly for bone tissue engineering applications where degradability and bioactivity are important factors. Balancing the material ratios allows for control of the degradation rate, the mechanical strength and formation of carbonated apatite at the surface. Additive manufacturing allows the creation of patient-specific implants with complex shapes and controlled porous structures, ideal for this application.

15:30
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Presentation Level: Intermediate

    Loughborough University has developed a new 3D simulation technique (called VOLCO) to predict the as-fabricated 3D geometry, for parts produced by material extrusion additive manufacturing, with a resolution of 0.01-0.05 mm. The focus of VOLCO is on how extruded filaments interact with each other and how this affects geometry and mechanical properties of 3D printed parts. This talk will show 3D simulations and demonstrate how they enable prediction of mechanical properties, via finite element analysis, prior to manufacture. It will also demonstrate how custom toolpath generation methods (i.e. “one-shot slicing”) can improve the properties of high-value and high-precision products.

10:30
  1. U50
    30 mins
    In the summer of 2015, the Natural History Museum embarked on an ambitious plan to remove a 23-metre-long blue whale skeleton from the Mammal Hall. The museum wanted to thoroughly clean and conserve it as well as 3D scan it at sub-millimetre resolution. The plan was to suspend it from cables, in an entirely new pose, in the newly renovated Hintze Hall. 
11:00
  1. U50
    30 mins

    The BMW Group has always been an early adopter of new technologies. Today, they are the leader of incorporating additive manufacturing processes and materials in the automotive sector. The company has worked hard to set up a strategic roadmap for metal and plastic 3D printing. By creating systematic pilot projects, they have successfully proved that AM is ready for series production. They now use AM to substitute tools for small batches, to personalise and to optimise designs for end-use parts. The company also works closely with innovative start-ups and well-established global players. This presentation will give an insight into how the BMW Group progressed from SLA printing to creating functional, end-use parts with AM. The session will also examine the advancements in the Digital Craftsmanship process chain for MINI Yours Customized.

    Dr Dominik Rietzel, Head of Additive Manufacturing at BMW Group, will also discuss how investments and partnerships helped the company develop end-use parts and set up a real AM series production. 

     

11:30
  1. U50
    30 mins

    This presentation will provide an overview of how PepsiCo’s Global R&D team is using 3D printing to design and develop beverage packaging. The session will examine R&D’s strategic partnership with the design department and provide prototyping insights. Andrew Phinney, Packaging Engineer at PepsiCo, will also discuss a recent case study which used 3D printing to create a limited-edition packaging for a movie premiere.

     

12:00
  1. U50
    30 mins
12:30
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Presentation Level: Intermediate

    Designing for additive manufacturing, technical issues and new guidelines have been the fundamental topics of discussion in the 3D printing world for a long time. The remaining question is, however, whether freeform fabrication is going to change the creative practice.  This session will examine new design methods and tools and will address the early phase of new product development. Dr Steinar Killi will also present case studies of holistic design processes.

13:00
  1. U50
    30 mins

    Presentation Level: Beginner

    Prosthetic limbs can express personal style through various colours and finishes. This choice is not available to women who wear external breast prostheses. In addition, silicone prosthetic breasts are hot and heavy. Rosie Brave’s research seeks to establish how a reimagined breast form might be designed and explores how it can impact its wearer’s well-being.

    Colourful or patterned breast forms do not currently exist on the market. 3D printing provides the ideal rapid prototyping tool to produce models that introduce the concept of a non-realistic breast form. Additive manufacturing helps to facilitate a discussion on how to re-design the weight, shape, and the material for a wearable product.

    Rosie began her research with the vision that 3D printing would provide a cost-effective solution which meets the consumer trend for mass customisation and bespoke experience. Printing with powder and with plastic filaments, however, offered inadequate surface quality. Switching to silicone, became the principal challenge.

    This presentation will examine how 3D printing helped to enhance Rosie's research and the drawbacks of AM. The session will also discuss how she utilises this technology to produce tooling for moulding silicone breast forms.


 

THANKS TO OUR SUPPORTERS

Platinum Partners


 

Partners

 

Partners

 

Partners

 

Partners

 

Partners

10,129

Attendees

239

Exhibitors

62

Presentations

35

Product Launches

Opening Times

Tuesday 25 Sept  9:30 - 17:00
Wednesday 26 Sept 9.30 - 17.00
Thursday 27 Sept  9:30 - 16:00

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